Ricoh Auto Half G

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

The Ricoh Auto Half was made in Japan by Ricoh from c.1960-1963. It was a 35mm half frame camera, with clockwork motor film advance for 25 to 30 exposures. The 25mm f2.8 3 groups 4 elements lens was surrounded by the selenium cell operating the exposure metering, setting aperture automatically, with manual override option. Shutter speeds were 1/30 sec. (flash sync.) or 1/125 sec. with automatic exposure.

It was also sold by Ansco as the Ansco Memo II.

Yashica Half 17

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

The Half 17 is a half-frame 35 mm viewfinder camera made by Yashica in about 1964. It has a six-element 32 mm f/1.7 Yashinon lens (a wide maximum aperture for a popular camera of the time) and a Copal BR shutter. There is a selenium meter, with the cell arranged around the lens, and the camera is normally used with automatic exposure, which follows a program between 1/30 second at f/1.7 (EV 6½) and 1/800 second at f/16 (EV 17½). The metered shutter speed (but not the aperture) is displayed in the viewfinder. There is also a setting for ‘B’ shutter (the aperture is then set to f/1.7), and manual aperture settings for use with flash. There is a PC socket on the left end of the body, and a cold shoe on the top. There is a film speed dial on the top plate, allowing speeds from 12 to 400 ASA.

The lens has scale focusing down to 0.8 meter, and zone-focusing symbols are displayed in the viewfinder (for a head-and-shoulders portrait at 0.8 m, a half-figure portrait at 1.2 m, a group at 3 m and a scene at infinity). The viewfinder has a brightline frame, with markings for parallax error correction when focused close.

The film is advanced with a toothed wheel at the bottom of the back. The rewind release button and a folding rewind crank are on the base.

Two similar cameras, the Half 17 Rapid and the Half 17 EE Rapid were made the following year, for Agfa’s Rapid film cassettes rather than regular 35 mm cassettes. The Half 14 for regular 35 mm film, with an f/1.4 lens, followed in 1966.

Ricoh Auto Half E Special Edition

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

The Ricoh Auto Half was made in Japan by Ricoh from c.1960-1963. It was a 35mm half frame camera, with clockwork motor film advance for 25 to 30 exposures. The 25mm f2.8 3 groups 4 elements lens was surrounded by the selenium cell operating the exposure metering, setting aperture automatically, with manual override option. Shutter speeds were 1/30 sec. (flash sync.) or 1/125 sec. with automatic exposure.

It was also sold by Ansco as the Ansco Memo II.

Ricoh Auto Half SE2

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

The Ricoh Auto Half was made in Japan by Ricoh from c.1960-1963. It was a 35mm half frame camera, with clockwork motor film advance for 25 to 30 exposures. The 25mm f2.8 3 groups 4 elements lens was surrounded by the selenium cell operating the exposure metering, setting aperture automatically, with manual override option. Shutter speeds were 1/30 sec. (flash sync.) or 1/125 sec. with automatic exposure.

It was also sold by Ansco as the Ansco Memo II.

Yashica 35 ME

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

The Yashica 35-ME is a small, compact 35mm viewfinder camera with auto-exposure, made in Japan by Yashica, introduced c. March 1972.

The film speed is set using a ring around the lens, with a display just below.

The top plate carries the shutter release, hot shoe and frame counter.

Petri Computor 35

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

The Computor 35 was a 35mm rangefinder camera made in Japan by Petri. It had automatic exposure via a CdScell mounted on the front of the lens (inside the filter thread) and electronically-controlled shutter, with red & green LEDs on top of the camera indicating slow (<1/30s) or fast enough speed selection. There was a coupled rangefinder operated by the focussing ring with a lever attached (shown in the picture, to the right of the lens). The film speed was set by a ring at the front of the lens between 25 – 800 ASA.

The lens was labelled C.C. Petri 1:2.8 f=40mm, stopping down to f22.

 

 

Minolta Repo S

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

The Minolta Repo took half frame pictures on 35mm film, the camera was a fixed Minolta Rokkor 30mm F2.8 lens with a Citizen shutter, manual (guess) focus with adjustable aperture. It is introduced in 1962.

  • A built in meter upon the top plate allowed the user to change the aperture so that you aligned the needles up for correct exposure.
  • Manual wind on and rewind
  • Portrait format viewfinder with bright line edges but no other information
  • Flash PC socket and cold shoe
  • CDS Meter

Konica EYE 2

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

Konica was the oldest Japanese camera company until it stopped its camera activity in 2006. Konica EYE 2 is a half frame camera and a successor to the popular Konica EYE.

Canon Dial 35

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

The Canon Dial 35was an unconventional half-frame 35mm camera with clockwork automatic film advance. It was made in Japan by Canonfrom November 1963. The Dial 35 was also sold as the Bell & Howell Dial 35.

The body had an unusual “portrait” format rectangular shape, with a short, wide-diameter lens barrel containing the CdS meter photocells window around the 28mm lens. Rotating the lens barrel set the speed of the Seikoshashutter; the aperture was set automatically. A button below the viewfinder could be pulled out to give manual aperture control, for manual exposure settings or flash. Film speed was set on a scale around the meter window.

Focus was set on a lever around the top of the lens barrel, with a display inside the viewfinder.

There was a cylindrical handle at the bottom, which also wound the clockwork mechanism. On the (users) left is an accessory shoe. The film ran vertically, from the cassette at the top to the take-up spool at the bottom, giving a landscape-format 24×18mm frame when the camera is upright.

Beier Beirette 35

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

Beirette 35 is a 35mm film viewfinder camera made by Beier and introduced in c.1988. It is in the long lasting Beier Beirette series.

It is basically Beier Beirette VSN with black plastic body and CdS exposure metering. It has three speeds Priomat shutter with weather symbols, manually setting aperture with green-red LEDs in bright frame finder, rapid lever and Meritar 45mm f/2.8 lens.

Ricoh Caddy

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

In 1960, Ricoh jumped onto the half-frame bandwagon with the first model in the popular Auto-Half series. Still testing the waters, in 1961 they came out with a half-frame aimed at a different photographic niche. The Ricoh Caddy is a small, simple, but fully functional camera, but quite a bit defferent from the much more familiar Ricoh Auto Half series. First, it dropped the spring-drive of the Auto Half. Second, it has a 25mm (f2.8) lens — like the Auto Half — but it was a focusing lens. The slightly-wide 25mm lens is equivalent to a 35mm lens on a full-frame 35mm camera. It is recessed into the camera body and only the lens controls actually protrude. Focusing is from infinity to 3.3 feet. The other big difference was that the Caddy has full manual control of the f-stops and shutter speeds. Apertures run from f2.8 to f 16 with speeds of B, 1/4 – 1/250.

The camera has a built in selenium meter and an EV-based manual exposure control system. The camera has a cold flash shoe, PC contact, tripod socket, and cable release socket. Accepts 25mm filters. Film advance is with a dial under the right thumb. It’s a nice, versatile camera in a very small package, but harder to find than most Ricohs.

Minolta Repo

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

(1962) The Repo was Minolta’s attempt to break into the lucrative half-frame market. This original version of the Repo had a 30mm, manually-focusing (f2.8 – 16.0) lens with close-focusing to two feet! A selenium meter on the front of the camera displays “match-needle” exposure information in a window on the top of the camera. The camera has shutter speeds of 1/30 – 1/250, plus B. The exposure system is similar to the Canon Demi and Konica Eye of the same time period. The aperture and shutter speed are controlled together by turning a single ring around the lens. At one end of the scale, the camera sets 1/30 at f2.8. Turning the ring all the way produces 1/250 at f16. It had a built in cold, flash-shoe and PC contact which many small cameras lacked. For flash use, a separate aperture scale is used, which sets the shutter speed to 1/30 — great for night shots without a flash. The exposure ring also has a “B” setting which sets the f-stop to f2.8 — great for long exposures. Tripod socket and cable release socket. 25mm filter thread. Uses a D39KA lens shade. Film speeds from 10 – 400.

Canon Demi Blue

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<The Old Fox vintage cameras are NOT new but refurbished used cameras>

In 1963, after the success of the Olympus Pen camera, Canon decided to enter the half-frame market. The Demi was the first Canon half-frame and sported a 28mm (f2.8-22) manually-focusing lens (5 elements in 3 groups). Shutter speeds of B, 1/30 – 1/250. It had a selenium meter, with a match-needle system (readout on top of camera) that set the shutter speed and aperture at the same time by turning a single ring on the front of the lens. At f2.8 the shutter speed is 1/30, at f22 the speed is 1/250. The settings could be made manually — disregarding the meter — but you were stuck with the combination of f-stop and shutter speed that it gave you as you turn the ring. This exposure setup was used by several other half-frame cameras, such as the Soviet Agat 18. At the B and FLASH (1/30) settings, the f-stop could be set independently of the shutter speed. The camera also had a PC contact, but no built-in shoe. Focus detents at 1 m, 3 m, and 15 m. The lens shows distance icons instead of numbers, however a scale on the back of the camera translates the icons into numbers. Close-focusing to 0.8 m. Film speed range of ISO 10 – 400.